[ Ness | Tampa | 18 | INFP ]
[ Asexual | Genderfluid ]

Intersectional feminist, gamer, nerd, roleplayer, & the heroine Gotham needs.
I blog DC & Marvel comics, cosplay, and cute animals. My sideblog covers gaming and anime. I tag almost all of my posts.
She/her/hers ;; he/him/his

3DS FC: 1779 - 0401 - 2649
The 5'3" Caped Crusader
comicsalliance:

THE ‘F’ WORD: WONDER WOMAN’S FEMINISM SHOULDN’T BE COVERED UP
By Janelle Asselin
DC has a Wonder Woman problem. Or perhaps more accurately, Wonder Woman has a DC problem. The idea of Wonder Woman as a feminist icon is so imprinted in her history, and in analysis of the character, that separating her from feminism should be near impossible. But that hasn’t stopped people trying.
Much has been written over the years about the ebb and flow of feminism in the Wonder Woman comics, the relative feminism of her appearances on the small screen, and her role as an icon for the movement. A recent interview with the new Wonder Woman creative team of Meredith Finch and David Finch has brought the topic back into focus.
To give a bit of background for those who may need it, the character’s creator, William Moulton Marston, was actually not a feminist – he didn’t believe that men and women were equal; he believed that women were superior to men. Most of the early Wonder Woman stories were about women dominating men to make the world a better place.
This isn’t feminism, because feminism is about all genders being equal. It’s an interesting world view, though, and one Marston believed would see fruition through the events of World War II. Women were gaining power as Wonder Woman’s story began, thanks to more women entering the work place to replace men who had gone to fight.
The character’s roots in an island made up entirely of women explains any belief she had in female superiority. However, Wonder Woman has evolved to be more of a true feminist.
Over the years, Wonder Woman’s story arcs have ranged from feminism to par-for-the-superheroine-course. Like all other female characters, she’s too often used as a prop in storylines about male characters, but unlike most other female characters she had a unique tool: her own television show.
That show, occurring when it did in the 1970s, struck a chord with women of all ages and cemented Wonder Woman’s place in the culture. She had already famously featured on the cover of the first issue of the feminist magazine Ms. in 1972, and for decades after, regardless of the quality of the comics, Wonder Woman has remained a feminist icon.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

THE ‘F’ WORD: WONDER WOMAN’S FEMINISM SHOULDN’T BE COVERED UP

By Janelle Asselin

DC has a Wonder Woman problem. Or perhaps more accurately, Wonder Woman has a DC problem. The idea of Wonder Woman as a feminist icon is so imprinted in her history, and in analysis of the character, that separating her from feminism should be near impossible. But that hasn’t stopped people trying.

Much has been written over the years about the ebb and flow of feminism in the Wonder Woman comics, the relative feminism of her appearances on the small screen, and her role as an icon for the movement. A recent interview with the new Wonder Woman creative team of Meredith Finch and David Finch has brought the topic back into focus.

To give a bit of background for those who may need it, the character’s creator, William Moulton Marston, was actually not a feminist – he didn’t believe that men and women were equal; he believed that women were superior to men. Most of the early Wonder Woman stories were about women dominating men to make the world a better place.

This isn’t feminism, because feminism is about all genders being equal. It’s an interesting world view, though, and one Marston believed would see fruition through the events of World War II. Women were gaining power as Wonder Woman’s story began, thanks to more women entering the work place to replace men who had gone to fight.

The character’s roots in an island made up entirely of women explains any belief she had in female superiority. However, Wonder Woman has evolved to be more of a true feminist.

Over the years, Wonder Woman’s story arcs have ranged from feminism to par-for-the-superheroine-course. Like all other female characters, she’s too often used as a prop in storylines about male characters, but unlike most other female characters she had a unique tool: her own television show.

That show, occurring when it did in the 1970s, struck a chord with women of all ages and cemented Wonder Woman’s place in the culture. She had already famously featured on the cover of the first issue of the feminist magazine Ms. in 1972, and for decades after, regardless of the quality of the comics, Wonder Woman has remained a feminist icon.

READ MORE

dynastylnoire:

stair-diving-with-hayes:

Ladies and Gentleman, the man that will be in history books. He was throwing the burning tear gas. Not to the cops but away from the children protesting. In his American Shirt and bag of chips. Check his twitter.

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

2damnfeisty:

"14-year-old Parkview High School Freshman, Caleb Christian was concerned about the number of incidents of police abuse in the news.  Still, he knew there were many good police officers in various communities, but had no way of figuring out which communities were highly rated and which were not.  

So, together with his two older sisters: Parkview High School senior Ima Christian, and Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology sophomore, Asha Christian, they founded a mobile app development company– Pinetart Inc., under which they created a mobile app called Five-O.

Five-O, allows citizens to enter the details of every interaction with a police officer.  It also allows them to rate that officer in terms of courtesy and professionalism and provides the ability to enter a short description of what transpired.  These details are captured for every county in the United States. Citizen race and age information data is also captured.

Additionally, Five-O allows citizens to store the details of each encounter with law enforcement; this provides convenient access to critical information needed for legal action or commendation.”

Read more here. [x]

Black Excellence

(Source: skulls-and-tea)

(Source: garnetquyen)

File under:
#nova #marvel

crap. i’m gonna miss school.

(Source: bartony)


Track:

Plays: 356,975 plays

comfortableandkind:

kickitoldskool:

from the guy who brought you “Actual Cannibal Shia Labeouf,” please enjoy a new song entitled “Christian Bale is at Your Party”

image

OH MY GOD NO STOP EVERYTHIGN STOP AND LISTEN THIS IS IMPORTANT S T O P THE W O R L D

(Source: peterpancaked)

marvelland:

get to know meme → 10 characters

1. laura kinney/x-23

File under:
#star trek #.gif

Ships of the Line Pt. 2: Other Notable Vessels (Pt. 1)

File under:
#quote #oh wow
— potential Onion headline (via pansexualpagan)

aegontargaryen:

Batwoman #31

(Source: hawkmans)

fyeahanimatedladies:

36. Penny Proud

from Disney’s The Proud Family.

The Proud Family is one of two successful cartoons with a black female main character - the other being Doc McStuffins which just came out in 2012.  Penny Proud is an important, iconic character.

She’s a super smart girl with great leadership skills and becomes super dedicated to every project she takes on - whether it be giving another girl a makeover, practicing for a dance competition, or working on her part in the school play.  Penny solves all her problems with hard work and advice from her mom, her Suga Mama, and her dad, and always tries to do the right thing.

Through Penny’s struggles and achievements, this show tackles really important issues: sexism, racism, Islamophobia, ableism… can I say it again?  This show is so good and so important and Penny is a really awesome character.

If you’re looking to rewatch shows from your childhood, start with The Proud Family.  These messages from back in 2001 are still relevant.

File under:
#idris elba

(Source: aikaterine-seven)

File under:
#the joker #joker
Batman: Arkham Asylum Character Models - The Joker

(Source: glitterthieves)

File under:
#ferguson

soprie:

Stop calling what’s happening in Ferguson a “riot”.

It is not a riot.

Vancouver losing the Stanley Cup a few years ago was a riot. It was angry, drunken destruction with no purpose. (And as a Canadian, it was a shameful event)

Ferguson is not a riot. It is a protest. It is an uprising. It is a civil rights revolution. The prople of Ferguson may be angry, but they have a reason to be angry, and they are not violent, and they are not hooligans, thugs or looters. They are protesting for their human rights which are currently being denied.

Look at the difference between a riot and a protest. A riot is chaos. A protest has a purpose.

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